The Gamification User Types Hexad Scale

The Gamification User Types Hexad Scale

Written by Gustavo Tondello. Infographics by Marim Ganaba. Several studies have indicated the need for personalising gamified systems to users’ personalities. However, mapping user personality onto design elements is difficult. To address this problem, Marczewski developed the Gamification User Types Hexad framework, based on research on human motivation, player types, and practical design experience. He also suggested different game design elements that may support different user types. However, until now we were still lacking a standard assessment tool for user’s preferences based on the Hexad framework. There was also no empirical validation, yet, that associated Hexad user types and game design elements. A collaborative research project by the HCI Games Group, the Austrian Institute of Technology, and Gamified UK sought to accomplish these two goals: (1) create and validate a standard survey to assess an individual’s Hexad user type and (2) verify the association between the Hexad user types and the game design elements they are supposed to appeal to. In case you are not familiar with the Hexad user types yet, please take a moment to watch this video

Does Gamification Work in the Software Development Process?

Does Gamification Work in the Software Development Process?

Written by Alberto Mora. Puede leer la versión en español de este post aquí. A lot has been written about the benefits of gamification in recent years. When people talk about gamification they generally focus on sectors such as education, marketing, sales, energy, and health. However, there are a variety of different areas that could benefit from gamification, but have not been thoroughly explored, such as software development. The main purpose of gamification in the field of software development is to motivate developers to adopt or improve the best programming practices while working on software projects. Project managers know the importance of having development teams that are highly motivated, committed to their projects, and dedicated to applying best practices. Teams with these attitudes are more likely to succeed, as well as gain more satisfaction from the project and from their clients. In contrast, there are severe consequences for development teams that lack motivation. For instance, projects where developers are demotivated evince bugs due to low quality or no testing, continuous delays in deadlines, failure to adopt requirements, low collaboration among

Creatures of Habit — Examining Automatic Behaviour in Online Games

Written by Mike Schaekermann. In everyday life, we seldom do things for the first time. Instead, a large part of our behaviour is determined by habits rather than conscious motivation [1]. Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that habitual behaviour may also be a strong determinant for what we do as players in online gaming environments. A major focus of the HCI Games Group is on developing a deeper understanding of the psychological constructs that drive human behaviour in digital games. In this spirit, one of our ongoing projects revolves around the underrepresented topic of habits in online games. Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs) naturally lend themselves to a closer examination of habitual gaming patterns for two reasons: first, players who like a particular game often spend large amounts of time in its virtual environment, increasing the chance of certain behaviours to be performed repeatedly and eventually turn into habits. Second, it is not uncommon for game studios to store detailed information about what players do in the game environment — a technique referred to as “telemetry” [5]. This information is

What is Gamification anyway?

What is Gamification anyway?

You may have heard of word Gamification. It’s as much a buzzword as it is a new academic field. Many people are interested in what it is and how to use it effectively, but don’t know why it works. It’s clear why, since games excite us by driving our curiosity to discover something new. They make us feel accomplished when we overcome a difficult challenge or reach personal objectives. Games help us learn and encourage us to experiment, develop strategies, and learn new skills. Gamification takes core elements of what we love about games and applies them outside of traditional gameplay environments. Everyone is talking about the benefits of gamification and how it will increase engagement in the classroom, or help us stay fit and healthy, or improve our productivity in the workplace. Here is a clip from our new whiteboard #animation! Candy crush-angry birds 🎮! Watch it here: https://t.co/QgMGQZDdSC pic.twitter.com/R1v4mn59vc — HCI Games Group (@hcigamesgroup) July 14, 2016 To help you understand the basics of gamification, we created the video below, which should help you become familiar with the

Pokémon Go has arrived in Canada

Written by Lennart E. Nacke, Director of the HCI Games Group. It happened this afternoon. I was on a weekend trip. Outside of town. Pokémon Go finally arrived in Canada. I did not believe what happened next. Pokémon GO is now available in Canada! Discover and capture Pokémon all around you. pic.twitter.com/uTXwIk85IZ — Pokémon GO (@PokemonGoApp) July 17, 2016 The public reaction — as I walked across a local park in a remote little summer vacation town — was tantalizing. All of a sudden flocks of people were moving around the streets of the little town, their phones in hand. Spotting for Pokéstops. While some folks have been playing the game with a US copy in Canada for a little over a week (it was released in the US on July 6), it is now finally and officially everywhere in Canada. Local Canadians were very excited and random conversations between strangers were happening with game knowledge exchange as these people were playing together. It’s definitely a location-based game (not really an augmented reality game like so many news outlets are keen to call it)

3 Inspiring Ways Gamification Is Being Used in Education

3 Inspiring Ways Gamification Is Being Used in Education

Written by Melissa Stocco. In my last post, I looked at the 15 ways gamification can be applied to education. I wanted to supplement my previous post by providing some concrete examples of how gamification is being used in the classroom. In addition, I made a list of tools for teachers and for students that utilize gamification for learning. 1. Gamification in the Classroom Ananth Pai is a teacher from Minnesota who uses gamification to individualize learning. Students progress through their coursework at their own pace, since some students will need more time to understand the material taught in class. With this method of teaching, students only move forward once they have mastered previous course concepts. This means that all of Pai’s students are working on different assignments or activities at the same time. 7th grade English teacher Megan Ellis talks about adding gamification into her classroom to improve her students’ study skills. Megan uses experience points to her classroom to motivate her students to complete homework, be on time for class, and improve their study habits in general. Megan

Biosignal Datasets for Emotion Recognition

Written by Mike Schaekermann. At the HCI Games Group, we love looking at emotion as a core driver of gameplay experience. One common technique used to find out how players experience a game prototype and what affective responses in-game interaction triggers, is to ask players how they feel after playing the game. For this purpose, different affective dimensions like arousal (i.e., the level of excitement), valence (i.e., good or bad) or dominance (i.e., how much the player felt in control) are often used to quantify subjective phenomena. As you can imagine, these types of self-reports are extremely valuable to iteratively improve a game prototype. However, one drawback of post-hoc questionnaires is that certain types of emotions are temporary bursts of experience which may fade over time. This becomes a problem if the goal is to investigate affective responses in real-time. To work around this problem, the use of biosignals like brain activity (e.g., through electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography), heart rate (e.g., through electrocardiography), skin conductance level, skin temperature or muscular activity (via electromyograms) has been suggested in the literature [1]. A

Three CHI 2016 Papers That Will Change the Way you Think About Game Design

Written by Lennart Nacke. If you work in the field of human-computer interaction, you are probably familiar with the field’s flagship conference: The Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems also known as CHI. The conference attracts between 3,500–4,000 attendees every year (this year 3,876 people attended [2016]) and moves across different international locations. Last year CHI was in Seoul, South Korea, and this year the conference was in the heart of Silicon Valley, San Jose, California, USA. CHI is an amazing conference that stimulates and moves people who work on the edge of technology innovation. While many of the CHI crowd are returning attendees, this year 50% of people attended for the first time. In addition, the keynotes and important talks were finally archived and live-streamed by SIGCHI. To understand #CHI2016 , I created a word cloud based on all session names (not paper titles) from Mon-Thu. #SIGCHI pic.twitter.com/TgI4ecNZP0 — Tadashi Okoshi (@TadashiOkoshi) May 22, 2016 It's so amazing seeing telepresence robots wandering around catching up with old friends #chi2016 #almostnormal pic.twitter.com/XtuReyYVcV — ACM CHI Conference (@sig_chi) May 10,

15 Ways Gamification Can Be Applied to Education

15 Ways Gamification Can Be Applied to Education

Written by Melissa Stocco. A big challenge teachers face is presenting course material in a way that peaks their students’ interest and engages them to participate. Gamification is a technique teachers can use to get students involved in classroom activities and encourage them to learn course material. Gamification does this by using “game design elements in non-game contexts” (Deterding et al., 2011). Gaming elements help motivate students by making lessons more fun and offering other incentives. For example, students answering questions in the classroom is not a gamified activity, but can be transformed into a gameful design by adding rewards or points for questions that are answered correctly. When I was in elementary school, one of my teachers had a “leaderboard” for the number of books we read that year. If you read a book in your free time, a star was added on beside your name. This gamified our independent reading by creating some healthy competition within the classroom. However, using extrinsic motivation for education is controversial, since students might lose interest once incentives like “stars” are removed. This

Repidly: A Lightweight Tool for the Collaborative Analysis of Biosignals and Gameplay Videos

Written by Mike Schaekermann of the HCI Games Group Analysing physiological biodata is often cumbersome, does often not have a fast turnaround and does not allow for collaborative annotation. In this blog post, I would like to present a lightweight collaborative web application that enables games user researchers, designers, and analysts to easily make use of biosignals as metrics for the evaluation of video games. Over the last few years, an increasing number of studies in the field of games user research (GUR) have addressed the use of biometrics as a real-time measure to quantify aspects gameplay experience (e.g., emotional valence and arousal). However, only few studies explore possibilities to visualize biometrics in a way that yields meaningful and intuitively accessible insights for games user researchers in a lightweight and cost-efficient manner. In effort to fill this gap, we developed a novel web-based GUR tool for the collaborative analysis of gameplay videos, based on biosignal time series data that aims at facilitating video game evaluation procedures in both large- and small-scale settings. In the video games industry, a rapidly growing