CHI 2017 Impressions

CHI 2017 Impressions

Attending conferences to present your own work and hear about the work of others is an important part of academic life. As HCI (human-computer interaction) researchers, one of the highlights of each one of our years is attending the top conference in our field, CHI (the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems). This year, we attended CHI 2017 to present some of our own research and stay up to date with the latest findings on HCI research. Here are some of our impressions and experiences! Dr. Lennart Nacke Associate Professor and Director of the HCI Games Group Going to CHI is always inspiring and entertaining. The more often I attend the conference, the more the people in my community there feel like a family to me. I have really enjoyed the volunteering that I have done for ACM SIGCHI in the past. This year, I had the pleasure of working on the new SIGCHI website that was unveiled at the conference and organized another special interest group on games research at CHI as well as chaired the subcommittee on games. This

International exchange project with Cyprus Interaction Lab

International exchange project with Cyprus Interaction Lab

Crosspost from SWaGUR.ca. An Exchange with Europe’s Cyprus Interaction Lab Earlier this summer, SWaGUR professor Lennart Nacke visited the Cyprus Interaction Lab visited from the Cyprus University of Technology on an Erasmus exchange for teaching and training of students there and to set up a collaboration with the group to integrate the local training efforts with the SWaGUR training opportunities in Canada. Many of the researchers there are interested in new interaction techniques and learning. Learning is, of course, an essential part of game design and there is an exciting overlap to the research being done in SWaGUR. At the meeting, the researchers discussed better training opportunities for students in Canada and in Cyprus and began a collaboration. As part of the initial Erasmus exchange, the next step was to send a visitor from the Cyprus Interaction Lab to Canada. A Research Visit from Cyprus Andreas Papallas, a Research Fellow at the Cyprus Interaction Lab visited the HCI Games Group at the Games Institute of the University of Waterloo in Canada last week from the Cyprus University of Technology, and presented an overview of design research theory applied to gamification and

My Life Has Turned Into a Nintendo Commercial

My Life Has Turned Into a Nintendo Commercial

By Colin Whaley of the HCI Games Group. The Nintendo Switch and Nintendo Wii U, despite having similar controllers and even some overlap in game libraries, are such fundamentally different experiences that I’ve bought the same game for it twice. The Switch’s launch commercial shows all manner of multiplayer experiences, including Mario Kart, with a huge focus on local multiplayer experiences; this was so enticing to me that I spent an additional $100 for Mario Kart 8 for the Switch on top of the price I paid for Mario Kart 8 on the Wii U. My purchase was justified, as the two consoles provide two fundamentally different experiences, and Mario Kart 8 is a fantastic example of this distinction. Nintendo’s 2012 console, the Wii U, had some fantastic games released for it (see: Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, Super Mario 3D World, Splatoon, and of course Mario Kart 8 and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild), but the console was very much so that — a home console for which transportation to friends’ houses, parties, etc. was labourious and

The Five Gamification Languages: Gameful Experiences That Last

The Five Gamification Languages: Gameful Experiences That Last

Written by Lennart Nacke, Director of the HCI Games Group. (Read on Medium or watch the Video.) Recently, I had the pleasure of being invited to give a keynote at the GamiLearn conference about the five gamification languages in Tenerife. I took the opportunity to discuss some ideas that have been floating around in my head regarding gamification. In my work, I take a design-centric approach to gamification. I want to build experiences for people that help them improve their lives. Games or gameful design is one way of doing this. The metaphor of languages is quite powerful for talking about design approaches and I picked it up from Gary Chapman’s famous love languages book (which I was reading at the time I was preparing the talk).

Designing Keyboards for an Aging Population

Designing Keyboards for an Aging Population

Written by Colin Whaley. For most people, physically using computer peripherals is not a usability barrier — a keyboard is a keyboard is a keyboard, right? However, for the elderly or those with nerve damage, both sensory and motor problems may make the use of such computer peripherals uncomfortable or even painful. At the University of Waterloo, I co-founded the enTECH Computer Club, a volunteer group that travels to retirement homes in the Waterloo Region and helps seniors learn how to use computers. The goal of enTECH is to help the residents keep in touch with their families in the digital age and to learn how to use technology for leisure. While volunteering, one of our volunteers noted that one of the residents he worked with did not want to use the computer: the resident mentioned that using the computer would be uncomfortable that day, specifically due to discomfort in her hands. Most often, residents decide not to work with us on a particular day due to tiredness — a physical reason for not doing so was surprising and an area where improvements in

Collection Interfaces for Digital Game Objects

Collection Interfaces for Digital Game Objects

Written by Gustavo Tondello. The HCI Games Group collaborated with a research project that also involved the Play & Interactive Experiences for Learning Lab at the New Mexico State University and the University of California at Irvine to investigate player behaviour regarding the collection of digital objects in games. The study aimed to understand what kinds of objects players collect and why. It was firstly presented at the CHI PLAY 2016 Conference, where it received an Honorary Mention as one of the best works present, and will be presented again next week at the upcoming Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco. The results suggested that collection interfaces currently available on most commercial games do not fully support players’ desires regarding their digital objects. Therefore, the research led to several design implications aimed to improve these interfaces in future games. These findings also have implications for serious games and gameful applications that use collections as one of the elements aimed at engaging and motivating the players. Regarding the types of objects that players usually collect in games, the most frequent

Jamie Madigan’s 30 Ideas Keynote at CHI PLAY 2016

Jamie Madigan’s 30 Ideas Keynote at CHI PLAY 2016

Written by Lennart Nacke. I am at the CHI PLAY conference (a conference series that I started 3 years ago in Toronto) in Austin, Texas and the conference just began with a great keynote from Jamie Madigan of The Psychology of Games. Look, it's @JamieMadigan kicking off #chiplay16 with https://t.co/rZFh5W06U0 pic.twitter.com/02th3IoQcH — Lennart Nacke (@acagamic) October 17, 2016 Jamie talked about a massive increase in game research in the past years ( think he mainly referred to psychology journals, but I believe this is a trend across fields). The useful thing about this increase in scientific approaches for understanding games, is that video game designers now also have more tools than ever to help them create better products and rely on science rather than on anecdotal evidence. Jamie presented 30 ideas for video game research across 9 topics. While I think many people found the talk very inspiring and the topics timely to be presented. However, since this is a community of researchers, from talking to some attendees in the lunch break (especially students), I got the feeling that many

CLEVER: Gamification and Enterprise Knowledge Learning

CLEVER: Gamification and Enterprise Knowledge Learning

Written by Dominic Elm, Dennis Kappen, Gustavo Tondello, and Lennart Nacke. CLEVER will be demonstrated during the Student Game Design Competition at CHI PLAY ’16. Knowledge management (KM) represents the process of effectively capturing, documenting, assimilating, sharing, and deploying organizational knowledge [1,2]. Focused aggregation of such knowledge is critical for maximizing organizational objectives, as well as the efficient and effective functioning of any enterprise. However, a main challenge for companies is the reluctance of their knowledge experts to share their intellectual capital [1,3]. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) provide the information technology to store, retrieve, and share knowledge; however, users often lack the motivation to engage with them. Observing this issue, Dominic Elm made the goal of his Master’s thesis to propose a solution to this problem using Gamification. Thus, he designed CLEVER, an online KMS that incorporates game elements to motivate and engage users. The system is composed of two parts: (1) an online knowledge repository, where employees can provide important knowledge to the company, and (2) a trivia strategy game that motivates players to interact with content from the

The Gamification User Types Hexad Scale

The Gamification User Types Hexad Scale

Written by Gustavo Tondello. Infographics by Marim Ganaba. Several studies have indicated the need for personalising gamified systems to users’ personalities. However, mapping user personality onto design elements is difficult. To address this problem, Marczewski developed the Gamification User Types Hexad framework, based on research on human motivation, player types, and practical design experience. He also suggested different game design elements that may support different user types. However, until now we were still lacking a standard assessment tool for user’s preferences based on the Hexad framework. There was also no empirical validation, yet, that associated Hexad user types and game design elements. A collaborative research project by the HCI Games Group, the Austrian Institute of Technology, and Gamified UK sought to accomplish these two goals: (1) create and validate a standard survey to assess an individual’s Hexad user type and (2) verify the association between the Hexad user types and the game design elements they are supposed to appeal to. In case you are not familiar with the Hexad user types yet, please take a moment to watch this video

Does Gamification Work in the Software Development Process?

Does Gamification Work in the Software Development Process?

Written by Alberto Mora. Puede leer la versión en español de este post aquí. A lot has been written about the benefits of gamification in recent years. When people talk about gamification they generally focus on sectors such as education, marketing, sales, energy, and health. However, there are a variety of different areas that could benefit from gamification, but have not been thoroughly explored, such as software development. The main purpose of gamification in the field of software development is to motivate developers to adopt or improve the best programming practices while working on software projects. Project managers know the importance of having development teams that are highly motivated, committed to their projects, and dedicated to applying best practices. Teams with these attitudes are more likely to succeed, as well as gain more satisfaction from the project and from their clients. In contrast, there are severe consequences for development teams that lack motivation. For instance, projects where developers are demotivated evince bugs due to low quality or no testing, continuous delays in deadlines, failure to adopt requirements, low collaboration among